Archive for Service Delivery

Creating an Infrastructure Upgrade and Managed Services Proposal

Creating an Infrastructure Upgrade and Managed Services Proposal

In this article, you will find information to help you understand the importance of creating and utilizing infrastructure upgrades and Managed Services proposals to help clearly define your scope of work, set appropriate expectations and shorten sales cycles.

 

What Are Infrastructure Upgrade and Managed Services Proposals?

The objective of an infrastructure upgrade and Managed Services proposal is to utilize data gathered during previous customer discovery meetings and onsite network and environment analyses in order to create a document that reflects a proposed scope of work, high-level implementation plan and estimated timelines and costs to:

  • Deliver solutions to improve the customer’s efficiencies and productivity while reducing costs and mitigating business pain and risk
  • Prepare the customer’s environment for the delivery of Managed Services

This document will reinforce the customer’s perception of you as a qualified, Trusted Advisor and help shorten sales cycles.

The infrastructure upgrade and Managed Services proposal is utilized in the following scenarios:

  • When closing a sales opportunity that includes modification, remediation or upgrades to equipment, software, workflows, processes or documentation in an existing environment, or any other activity required prior to the delivery of maintenance services under a Managed Services Agreement

Existing documents utilized to compile the data required to prepare the infrastructure upgrade and Managed Services proposal include:

  • Needs Analysis
  • Customer Information Worksheet
  • Network Analysis
  • Any other documentation or data gathered through physical means or the use of software tools

This information is used to develop the requirements contained in the infrastructure upgrade and Managed Services proposal.

 

Benefits of Infrastructure Upgrade and Managed Services Proposals

The act of developing an infrastructure upgrade and Managed Services proposal is often the first step taken by solution providers in preparation for closing a sale with a new prospect. Reasons for this include:

  • Validation as a Trusted Advisor that is technically capable of addressing the customer’s needs and value as a business partner
  • The ability to clearly document the customer’s needs and pain points
  • The ability to accurately represent the customer’s existing environment including:
    • All hardware including servers, desktops, laptops, smartphones/pda’s, routers, switches, firewalls and any other network-connected devices or appliances
    • All software and line of business application
    • All services
    • All network connections including VPNs
    • Affected workflows and processes
    • The ability to identify up-sell and cross-sell opportunities
    • The ability to develop a remediation plan and introduce solutions to address the customer’s needs and pain points
    • The ability to create a high-level project plan to address the required work scope

benefits of infrastructure upgrade

An infrastructure upgrade and Managed Services proposal is valuable to the customer as well, as it will:

 

  • Provide the customer the comfort level required to engage with the solution provider through validation of their technical proficiency and capability to address their business needs
  • Documents in a clear and easy to understand manner the customer’s existing pain points and challenges and illustrates the solution provider’s strategy to address them, along with the expected results.

The Deliverable

The infrastructure upgrade and Managed Services proposal is broken down into several specific sections, which include:

 

  • Title page
  • Table of contents
  • Introduction
  • Company biography
  • Initial site inspection
  • Network drawing illustrating current environment
  • Environmental concerns
  • Proposed work scope
  • High-level project plan and phases
  • Network drawing illustrating environment after infrastructure upgrade
  • Overview of Managed Services offering
  • Summary of proposal
  • Cost-savings analysis
  • Specifics, requirements, exclusions
  • Acceptance signature block
  • Price quote

infrastructure upgrade proposal deliverable

Title page

The title page of the infrastructure upgrade and Managed Services proposal should include your company name and logo, along with your customers, as well as any logos depicting your partnerships, affiliations and industry certifications or competencies.

Table of contents

The table of contents will help you and your customer quickly identify and access specific sections of the proposal

Introduction

This section of the proposal introduces your organization history and unique qualifications

Company biography

The company biography section of the proposal contains your certifications, partnerships and affiliations listed by section

Initial site inspection

The initial site inspection section of the proposal will contain a general summary of the current state of the customer’s environment and an overview of the network, and should not be too technical in nature, but simply technical enough to pass scrutiny should the proposal be “shopped” internally or externally

Network drawing (existing network)

This section of the proposal will contain a network drawing depicting the current state of the customer’s network environment, and will be used as a comparison against the network drawing illustrating the results of the upgrade later in the proposal

Environmental concerns

The environmental concerns section of the proposal will document and detail areas of concern which the proposal will address in a later section, and will cover hardware, software licensing, connectivity, security, efficiency and productivity

Proposed work scope

This section of the proposal will document a general high-level overview of the proposed work scope designed to address the environmental concerns of the previous section

High-level project plan

The implementation section of the proposal will illustrate a high-level project plan broken down into phases with an estimated timeframe for completion of each phase

Network drawing (results)

This section of the proposal will contain a network drawing depicting the results of the infrastructure upgrade, and will be used as a comparison against the earlier network drawing illustrating the current state of the network

Managed Services overview

The Managed Services overview section of the proposal will document the features and benefits of your Managed Services offering

Summary

This section of the proposal will provide a concise summary of the overall proposal and illustrate your unique qualifications to implement these services

Cost-savings analysis

A cost-savings analysis reflecting the customer’s ROI from receiving Managed Services is included in this section of the proposal

Specifics, requirements and exclusions

This section of the proposal will document your specifics, requirements and exclusions for delivering these services

Acceptance block

This section of the proposal contains a signature block for both you and your customer to sign, signifying acceptance of the proposal and agreement to begin work

Price quote

The price quote is included as a separate document to the proposal, and documents payment terms and financing options

 

Conclusion

A properly prepared infrastructure upgrade and Managed Services proposal will:

  • Project the appropriate image for new prospective customers
  • Validate a customer’s need for your services
  • Confirm the benefit you bring to your customers
  • Shorten your Managed Services sales cycle
  • Create an opportunity for selling new solutions

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Posted in: Operations, Secrets to improving an I.T. Services Practice, Service Delivery

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Processes and Procedures Necessary to Support Managed Service Delivery

Processes and Procedures Necessary to Support Managed Service Delivery

In addition to adopting the appropriate tools and technology to power Managed Services delivery in order to maximize efficiencies and maintain SLAs, the Solution Provider will need to develop effective processes and procedures for operating their service desk.

The goals of a successful Service Desk include providing a single point of contact for end-user issues, facilitating the restoration of normal service operation while minimizing impact to the end-user and delivering services within agreed-upon SLA’s.

Figure 1 – Service Desk Goals

service desk goals

The duties of a successful Service Desk include:

  • Receive all incident notifications – this can be through any means – phone, fax or Email
  • Record all incidents – this must be accomplished with a robust, searchable incident tracking system
  • Classify all incidents – correctly document the nature of the incident, including affected users, systems, hardware and services
  • Prioritize all incidents – proper prioritization is essential to effective escalation
  • Troubleshoot all incidents – perform established troubleshooting procedures according to manufacturer’s and vendor’s best practices
  • Escalate all incidents as necessary – proper escalation insures adherence to established SLAs (this includes escalation to 3rd-party vendors for support)
  • Maintain consistent communication with all parties – including end-users, their managers and higher, as well as your own internal Service Desk management hierarchy
  • Perform all scheduled activities – moves/adds/changes, maintenance, patch management, documentation and reporting
  • Prepare and brief reports to Service Desk management and/or clients on Service Desk performance

 

In order to maintain a successful Service Desk, internal objectives need to be clear, client requirements and SLAs documented and understood, and training for Service Desk Staff as well as clients needs to be conducted regularly. Service Desk deliverables need to be clearly defined and service levels monitored regularly and modified as needed. Additionally, clearly defined response, resolution and escalation times must be incorporated into an SLA and communicated to Service Desk staff as well as clients.

Figure 2 – Example SLA

example sla

It is also important to identify and document Service Desk support tiers. Providing this information to the client assists in managing appropriate expectations with all parties.

Figure 3 – Support Tiers

support tiers

An effective Service Desk relies on a clearly defined escalation process to insure that all service requests are handled in a consistent, standardized manner by each technician or system engineer.

 

Figure 4 – Service Request Escalation Procedure

escalation

If issue can be resolved in Tier 1:

tier 1

If issue cannot be resolved in Tier 1:

escalate to tier 2

If issue can be resolved through Tier 2 Support:

tier 2

If issue cannot be resolved through Tier 2 Support:

escalate to tier 3

If issue can be resolved through Tier 3 Support:

tier 3

If issue cannot be resolved through Tier 3 Support:

escalate to onsite support

If issue can be resolved through Onsite Support:

on site support

If issue cannot be resolved through Onsite Support:

IT manager decision

Service Desk Operations

In this section, you will find information to help you understand the general daily operations and workflow experienced while supporting end-user clients in a Managed Service Provider’s business. Whether you are a Solution Provider Owner/Operator, Account Manager or Systems Engineer, you’ll find important information about the Managed Services service delivery process.

What embodies a Managed Services service delivery process?

In this context, a Managed Services service delivery process is defined as those processes and workflows which are necessary in order to allow the Solution Provider the ability to effectively deliver scheduled and unscheduled services to their clients efficiently, and include:

  • Responding to Alert conditions and Service Requests
  • Following Best Practices for Problem Management and Resolution
  • Delivering services within established SLA’s

 

The Managed Services service delivery process addresses the following scheduled and unscheduled events:

  • Remote support
  • Onsite support

 

Information required by the System Engineer during Managed Services service delivery includes:

  • Documentation of end-user environments
    • Asset/Inventory information
    • Configuration information
    • Patch/Service Pack Level information
    • Remote access/security information
    • Client/User account, contact and service history information

 

Managed Services Tools employed by the System Engineer during service delivery include:

  • A Network Monitoring Solution
  • The Service Desk component of a Professional Services Automation (PSA) Solution
  • A Remote Access, or Remote Control Tool

 

The Managed Services service delivery process includes a documented procedure for addressing any and all activity performed by a System Engineer during service delivery, and embodies a workflow which easily directs the System Engineer throughout the service delivery decision process.

 

How does the System Engineer use information and Managed Services Tools during service delivery?

 

The ability for the System Engineer to access information and leverage Managed Services Tools effectively during service delivery is a critical component for maintaining efficiency and adhering to established SLA’s, contributing to the Solution Provider’s profitability and increasing client satisfaction.

 

Figure 5 – The Role of Information and Managed Services Tools

Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 3.40.32 PM

How does the System Engineer use a Problem Management and Resolution Workflow during service delivery?

In order to efficiently and effectively perform Managed Services service delivery, a consistent Problem Management and Resolution Workflow is required, allowing the Solution Provider the ability to standardize on their tools and technology, process and procedures. By following these standardized workflows, the System Engineer will increase efficiencies, and allow the Solution Provider to scale their services consistently to more clients, improving both client satisfaction and net profits.

The System Engineer’s Operational Role in the Managed Services service delivery process

In this context, the System Engineer participates in the Solution Provider’s Problem Management and Resolution process as a member of the Service Desk or Network Operations Center (NOC), and can be assigned to the following Tiers for escalation:

  • Tier 1
  • Tier 2
  • Tier 3

 

These Tiers are utilized in the prioritization and escalation process per the Solution Provider’s Service Desk Escalation Procedure. After an issue is identified and documented in the PSA Solution, non-critical incidents are normally assigned to Tier 1 for a System Engineer to begin problem resolution. Based upon priority, the issue will be escalated up through Tier 2 and Tier 3 support as necessary in order to adhere to the applicable SLA.

 

The Service Desk’s goals include:

  • Providing a single point of contact for end-user issues
  • Facilitating the restoration of normal service operation while minimizing impact to the end-user
  • Delivering services within agreed-upon SLA’s

 

The Service Desk’s duties include:

 

  • Receive all incident notifications through the Solution Provider’s preferred means – phone, fax, Email, Service Desk Portal, etc.
  • Record all incidents in the Solution Provider’s PSA Solution
  • Classify all incidents and correctly document the nature of the incident, including affected users, systems, hardware and services
  • Prioritize all incidents for effective escalation
  • Troubleshoot all incidents according to best practices
    • Escalate all incidents as necessary to maintain established SLA’s
    • Maintain consistent communication with all parties including end-users, their managers and higher, as well as Solution Provider’s own internal Management hierarchy
    • Perform all scheduled activities such as moves/adds/changes, maintenance, patch management, documentation and reporting

Day to Day Service Delivery

 

The System Engineer’s daily duties are determined by their Service Manager, whose responsibility includes the management of the Solution Provider’s Monitoring Solution and Service Desk, and the proper prioritization and assignment of all Service Requests to the appropriate Tier. Depending upon the Service Provider’s staffing level and number of clients managed, some staff may be assigned specifically to manage the Monitoring Solution, and fall outside of the Tier structure. The scheduling of all other onsite and remote service work is also the responsibility of the Service Manager, but this and other functions may be performed by a Dispatcher. It is the Service Manager’s ultimate responsibility to make certain the Service Desk is maintaining their SLA’s.

In this context, a System Engineer’s typical day may look like this:

  • Log in to Solution Provider’s PSA Solution
  • Review all newly-assigned Service Requests to him/her
  • Review any Service Requests previously assigned and still open to insure they are not in danger of falling outside of SLA (Service Manager will be alerted to this status automatically by PSA Solution before it occurs)
  • Work Service Requests in order of Priority
    • Accept Service Request and time stamp
    • Review Service Request
    • Contact client or end-user as needed to gather any necessary information in order to begin problem resolution
    • Consult information documented in PSA Solution as needed in order to perform problem resolution
    • Qualify issue to determine if it can be resolved through Tier 1 Support within SLA
    • Work issue to successful resolution
    • Verify issue to be resolved to end-user’s satisfaction
    • Document complete problem resolution details in PSA Solution, mark status Complete and time stamp
    • Service Request is held in Completed status for a minimum of 24 hours, after which the end-user is contacted to verify the issue has been resolved to their satisfaction and asked if the Service Request can be closed
    • Service Request is closed
  • If Service Request cannot be resolved through Tier 1 Support, or is in danger of falling outside of SLA:
    • Service Request is escalated to Tier 2 and successive Tiers of Support, or an onsite visit is scheduled as needed, and the problem resolution process continues

It is the System Engineer’s responsibility to perform their own follow-up calls 24 hours after a Service Request has been classified as completed to verify that an end-user’s Service Request was resolved to their satisfaction and their issue can be closed.

 

Identifying methods of service delivery

The Service Provider has the capability to deliver services from remote locations, at the Service Provider’s NOC or Data Center and at the client’s facilities.

Remote service delivery

Delivered from any location other than the client’s facilities, remote service delivery may employ an RMM solution, a PSA solution and a remote-control solution.

 

Figure 6 – Remote Service Delivery

managed service delivery

Service Delivery at the Service Provider’s facilities

Bench or lab services can be conducted at the Service Provider’s facilities, where the ability to multitask and leverage in-house resources increases efficiencies and time to resolution for hardware/software issues.

Service Delivery at the client’s facilities

Services may also be delivered at the client’s facilities when necessary; however, these services will be more costly to the Service Provider to deliver.

Posted in: Service Delivery

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